Lær om livet ombord på flådens flagskib under den kolde krig -
PEDER SKRAM. Fartøjet var bygget til at lede en kampgruppe af
krigsskibe, bestående af korvetter, missiltorpedobåde, ubåde og
minelæggere.

En unik oplevelse i Københavns Havn!Lær om livet ombord på flådens flagskib under den kolde krig -
PEDER SKRAM. Fartøjet var bygget til at lede en kampgruppe af
krigsskibe, bestående af korvetter, missiltorpedobåde, ubåde og
minelæggere.

En unik oplevelse i Københavns Havn!
From the bridge at the wheelhouse deck the Officer on Watch navigated and sailed the Frigate in accordance with directions from the Ops-room.
From the bridge at the wheelhouse deck the Officer on Watch navigated and sailed the Frigate in accordance with directions from the Ops-room.

Wheelhouse deck

Bridge/wheelhouse
From here the Officer on Watch navigated and sailed the Frigate in accordance with directions from the Ops-room. In addition to the Officer on Watch there was a look-out and a runner. It was from here, too, the officer handled tactical and civilian communication. Under more complicated conditions (like entering harbor, replenishment at sea or similar) the Captain (Commanding Officer), himself, took over. He normally did that from the open bridge.

 

Styrehus.jpg

Bridge/wheelhouse.

 

The shape of the wheelhouse is caused by the fact that originally there were two 127mm guns of which one was placed where now the HARPOON missiles are placed, and it was desired for the guns to be able to shoot as much to the sector astern as possible.

 

Ops-room
Behind the wheelhouse you will find the Operations room, normally called the Ops-room. Here the CEPLO (Computer-assisted Electronic PLOtting system) was placed. From the CEPLO the Frigate and the operations of the entire naval force could be controlled. The entire system is placed on a shock-resistant platform. On the two outer horizontal displays the plotters monitored the radar picture showing what took place on the surface in the air around the Frigate. When a radar track could be followed automatically, it was transferred to the two vertical displays, showing charts of coast lines, minefields, submarine areas, restrictions to sailing, reference positions etc.

 

The Captain was seated in front of the left display and the Operations Officer in front of the right one. In the middle there was room for a link operator, who could send small, SMS-like messages. To the left of the Captain the Weapons Officer was placed. On directions from the Captain he could pass target designations to the fire control centers or the Sea Sparrow center. 

 

O-rum.jpg

The Ops-rum.


In the Ops-rum the HARPOON and torpedo control was placed, too, for data directing the missiles and torpedoes to their respective targets to be entered in a hurry. Furthermore, there was a board for electronic warfare (monitoring the enemy's radar transmissions). Directly behind the Ops-room Fire Control center Alpha and the sonar room were situated.

 

Sonar room
The Frigate is fitted with a short-range, high frequency sonar type PMS26 for detection of submarines. Originally it was developed for helicopters, but it soon turned usable in ships where countering submarines had a lower priority. The sonar transmitter is placed in a well under the waterline from where it can be loverd down under the keel of the Frigate.

 

 

Sonarrum.jpg

The sonar room.


In the sonar room lowered down you may see the operation panel and the computing system for use when dropping depth charges. In front of the room you will find the two CEPLO computers of which one was a spare one.