Lær om livet ombord på flådens flagskib under den kolde krig -
PEDER SKRAM. Fartøjet var bygget til at lede en kampgruppe af
krigsskibe, bestående af korvetter, missiltorpedobåde, ubåde og
minelæggere.

En unik oplevelse i Københavns Havn!Lær om livet ombord på flådens flagskib under den kolde krig -
PEDER SKRAM. Fartøjet var bygget til at lede en kampgruppe af
krigsskibe, bestående af korvetter, missiltorpedobåde, ubåde og
minelæggere.

En unik oplevelse i Københavns Havn!
The period from 1946 up to 1991 has been called "The Cold War". The frigate Peder Skram was a major part of the Danish naval defense during the Cold War in the period 1966 to 1988.
The period from 1946 up to 1991 has been called "The Cold War". The frigate Peder Skram was a major part of the Danish naval defense during the Cold War in the period 1966 to 1988.

The Cold War

The period from 1946 to 1991 is called "The Cold War". The cooling of the relationship between the former allied powers from The Second World War - the Soviet Union, the US and Great Britain - turned cooler and cooler. In 1946 Europe was in fact divided into East and West Europe, split by the so-called Iron Curtain preventing the citizens of the totalitarian and soviet-dominated Eastern Europe from escaping to the democratic West.

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Map of WAPA (marked with red and NATO (marked in blue).

 

During this period a number of crises arose nearly resulting in a 3rd World War, like the blockade of Berlin in 1946, the Cuban crisis in 1962 where the Soviet Union tried to place missiles on Cuba, and the uprisings in Hungary in 1956 and in Czechoslovakia in 1968.

 

The West reacted by forming a military alliance called NATO countered in Eastern Europe by the Warsaw Pact under total Soviet control.

 

During most of The Cold War a balance of terror existed in which the US as well as the Soviet Union possessed such an amount of nuclear weapons that a nuclear war would be totally destructive to the whole world. Consequently, the risk was primarily a conventional war without the use of nuclear weapons, but the risk of an all-out nuclear exchange was overhanging during the entire period.

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Checkpoint Charlie between East and West Berlin.

At the end of the 80es the Soviet Union no longer could sustain the enormous costs of the weapons race, and at the same time a yearn for democracy starting growing up in all Eastern Europe. In 1989 the Berlin Wall fell, and in 1991 the Warsaw Pact was dissolved, thereby ending The Cold War.

Denmark during The Cold War


During The Cold War its closeness to the Soviet Union, Poland and East Germany made the Denmark a front line country with Bornholm even lying behind the Iron Curtain. The Soviet Union depended on the Danish Straits for access to the Atlantic by their high-priority Baltic Fleet, and Denmark would be an excellent marshalling area for a subsequent assault on the West. If war was imminent Denmark, consequently, had to mine its straits and afterwards drop anti-invasion mines along the coasts of the Sealand group of islands. That done, the Navy in coordination with the West German fleet and Fleet Air Arm was to launch a decisive missile attack on the invasion forces of the Warsaw Pact when they passed Bornholm on their way to the beaches of Sealand.



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The defence listening station Sandagergaard on Amager.

During most of the "war" the two parties kept a close eye on each other. The Warsaw Pact placed a large number of "spy-vessels" in the focal points of the Danish waters, and all naval exercises were closely monitored. The Danish Navy, too, gathered information via its regular patrols along the territorial borders of East Germany, Poland and the Soviet Union. Furthermore, a number of listening installations were monitoring their electronic transmissions.

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Folder as the Ministry of Interior issued in the sixties to all households in Denmark.