Lær om livet ombord på flådens flagskib under den kolde krig -
PEDER SKRAM. Fartøjet var bygget til at lede en kampgruppe af
krigsskibe, bestående af korvetter, missiltorpedobåde, ubåde og
minelæggere.

En unik oplevelse i Københavns Havn!Lær om livet ombord på flådens flagskib under den kolde krig -
PEDER SKRAM. Fartøjet var bygget til at lede en kampgruppe af
krigsskibe, bestående af korvetter, missiltorpedobåde, ubåde og
minelæggere.

En unik oplevelse i Københavns Havn!
At Nyholm berths were built for construction of warships, and in 1692 the first ship being launched from Nyholm was the ship of the line, Dannebrog, which, incidentally, blew up on October 4th 1710 during a battle with the Sweden at Køge Bay.
At Nyholm berths were built for construction of warships, and in 1692 the first ship being launched from Nyholm was the ship of the line, Dannebrog, which, incidentally, blew up on October 4th 1710 during a battle with the Sweden at Køge Bay.

Nyholm - Naval station Copenhagen

As Copenhagen grew, it was getting impractical to base the Navy in the middle of the town. The many wooden ships caused a risk of fire, and it was normal for the crews to drop all kinds of waste directly into the harbor having bad influence of the health of the population of the town.

 

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A view over Nyholm - Naval station Copenhagen

 

In 1680 a plan for moving the ships out of the town was hatched. Responsible for the plan was General-Admiral-Lieutenant Niels Juel. West of some shallow sands called Revshalen (Refshalen) ships for scrap were filled with stones and sunk. In 1685 a defensive rampart with seven bastions was built stretching out from Christianshavn. The bastions are still there, and in a couple of them you can still see the original gun powder magazines (Carls Bastion and Wilhelms Bastion being the oldest buildings at Holmen, from 1688 and 1690 respectively). The battery, Sixtus, still remains, too, and here the Ensign of the Realm is flown and guns are saluting at e.g. the birth of a prince or princess. Every morning at 08.00 and at sunset a gun is fired telling the ships lying at Holmen, that it is time to hoist or haul down their ensign and the jack.

 

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The old main guard building "Under the Crown".

 

Sinking of old ships continued, and the gaps between them were filled with mud and dirt from the streets of Copenhagen. In some streets the dirt was heaped meter-high so there plenty of material. In this way an island took shape, and it got the name Nyholm. At the end of Nyholm the ship of the line, the Elefanten, was sunk at a 90⁰ angel to the island, thus providing lee and protection to the ships anchored at Nyholm. The Elefanten, which originally stood out as a small island, soon merged with Nyholm as a kind of a pier. The water between Nyholm and Sjælland was called "The Berth of the Navy".

Originally Nyholm was somewhat smaller than today - ranging from its present northern end at Sixtus to where the Western Tackle Building is situated today. Later, between 1780 and 1820, the island was extended to Charlotte Amalie's Bastion as it is today.

 

 

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Eastern Tackle Building.

 

At Nyholm berths were built for construction of warships, and in 1692 the first ship being launched from Nyholm was the ship of the line, the Dannebrog, which, incidentally, blew up on October 4th 1710 during a battle with the Sweden at Køge Bay. Eventually, building of major ships moved from Gammelholm to Nyholm. The last ship was launched in 1918, whereupon shipbuilding and a number of other workshops moved to the Dokø, lying further south.

 

 

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The old mast crane and the "Planbygningen".

 

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The Naval academy


Sixtus m. kanoner

The Sixtus batteri